What is Egg White Protein Powder and The Benefits

Egg protein has been (and still is) one of the staples among bodybuilders since the Arnold era. Given that 70% of the protein in an Egg is contained within the egg whites, it’s no wonder why the supplement companies have created egg whites in powdered form.

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    Egg whites have been a staple in every bodybuilder’s diet since the beginning of time, and for good reason. Egg whites have been proven to be the gold standard of whole protein food sources and it was ranked as so according to Muscle & Fitness Magazine. This is primarily due to its high protein content, in conjunction with crucial essential amino acids and more which we’ll touch on throughout the article.

    If you aren’t familiar, egg whites are the white portion of an egg surrounding the yellow/orange yolk. Fun fact – the egg white portion of an egg contains more than 70% of all protein and essential amino acids found in an egg.

    Talk about nutrition value!

    While people commonly supplement with protein powder post-workout, or as a snack throughout the day, the majority opt for a whey or casein blend. This is because of its proven benefits for muscle growth and repair. However, is whey and casein truly superior to egg protein, or are people simply misinformed or uneducated on the matter?

    In this article, which details the benefits of egg protein powder, you’ll soon find it! Throughout your read, you’ll learn what egg white protein powder is, where it comes from, and how to supplement with it properly. In addition, you’ll learn its vast benefits, some common side effects, and a pivotal comparison to the more popular protein powders on the market.

    In the end, you’ll be more educated on what egg white powder is and whether or not it’s the best protein supplement choice for you!

    Nonetheless, whether you decide for or against it, there’s no denying that egg white powder is an up-and-coming protein supplement source that trumps many of the options on the market today.

    So, want to learn about all things egg whites?! Let’s get into it!

    What is Egg White Protein Powder?

    As mentioned above, egg white protein powder is a derived protein source from the white portion of an egg, disregarding the yolk. Egg white powder is a newer form of protein powder and is becoming more and more popular by the day.

    Packed with nutrients, essential amino acids, and proteins, egg white protein is an excellent option for those with lactose intolerances or who simply want a healthy protein source that bolds well for recipes, shakes, and baking snacks.

    While egg protein has shown some promising data behind its effectiveness, the question remains: is it better than its competitor’s whey and casein?! Or is it simply just a good alternative?

    We’re about to find out, but first: How is it made, and how should you consume it?

    How Egg White Powder is Made

    Egg whites in their whole form contain approximately 3.6 grams of protein per egg white. In contrast, it contains little to no carbs, cholesterol, or saturated fats, hence why it’s the best organic protein source on the planet. In addition to their purity, egg whites also contain all of the essential amino acids necessary for stimulating protein synthesis, a process that elicits muscle development.

    When comparing it to other protein powders, one scoop of egg white powder contains 110 calories, 25 grams of protein, 0 grams of fat, and 2 grams of carbs.

    When deciding how to use it, simply supplement it as you would any other protein powder (whey, casein, etc.). With that said, consuming one scoop mixed with water as a post-workout shake may be your best bet!

    Egg white protein powder is also an excellent tool for cooking and baking!

    How to Use Egg Protein Powder

    Egg whites in their whole form contain approximately 3.6 grams of protein per egg white. In contrast, it contains little to no carbs, cholesterol, or saturated fats, hence why it’s the best organic protein source on the planet. In addition to their purity, egg whites also contain all of the essential amino acids necessary for stimulating protein synthesis; a process that elicits muscle development.

    When comparing it to other protein powders, one scoop of egg white powder contains 110 calories, 25 grams of protein, 0 grams of fat, and 2 grams of carbs.

    When deciding how to use it, simply supplement it as you would any other protein powder (whey, casein, etc.). With that said, consuming one scoop mixed with water as a post-workout shake may be your best bet!

    Egg white protein powder is also a great tool used for cooking and baking!

    Benefits of Egg White Protein Powder

    Research has shown that egg white protein is not only more anabolic than its predecessors (soy, wheat, etc.), but it has also led to producing more significant results when it comes to lean muscle mass. In fact, in comparison to the most popular protein powdered supplements (whey, casein), egg white protein contains similar protein amounts, with minimal carbohydrate and fat to boot.

    This is primarily why egg whites are effective at building lean muscle mass, increasing strength, and improving overall recovery and performance.

    These incredible benefits are likely due, in part, to an increase in muscle protein synthesis and its more significant leucine content, an essential amino acid in the muscle-building process.

    Egg whites are also thought to be superior to whey and casein due to their excellent digestive properties. In short, digestion is key to repair and recovery. Unfortunately, while whey and casein certainly provide unique benefits, they fail to provide good digestion. In fact, many who supplement with whey and casein tend to experience gas, bloating, and indigestion, among other side effects.

    That’s why opting for an egg white protein source is king if you are seeking proper digestion and/or you’re lactose intolerant to dairy in any way.

    Aside from what’s been discussed, egg white powder also offers many other benefits! Below is a list of just a few of the most common:

    • Great Protein Source – comparative to the best protein powders on the market
    • Improve Overall Performance – great for athletes and gym-goers alike
    • It’s Dairy Free! great for those with dairy intolerances
    • Lower Calories – great for fat loss
    • Lower in Saturated Fat & Cholesterol – perfect for general health
    • Keeps You Full for Longer! Key for weight loss
    • Efficient in absorption! An advantage over its competitors
    • Generally safe and effective unless you have an allergy

     

    Other benefits include aiding in muscle growth and weight loss, reducing soreness and muscle fatigue, improving overall recovery, and it tastes pretty good too!

    While egg white protein powder has shown some promising data to back its benefits listed above, more research needs to be completed on the matter before any conclusive statements or recommendations are made.

    To continue the debate, it’s now time to dive into the comparison between the more popular and researched Whey protein powder and the newer, less studied egg white protein powder. Let’s get into it!

    Egg White Protein Powder vs Whey Protein Powder

    So, if you’re not lactose intolerant and you prefer the extra calories, you may be asking whether or not you should switch from whey protein powder or casein protein powder to the newer, less studied egg white protein powder…

    As all answers in the health and fitness industry go, it largely depends. It depends on your preferences, budget, goals, and health status, among other factors. After all, whey protein has been around for decades, while egg white protein hasn’t. It’s understandable, then, to lean towards the former. Moreover, if your main goal is muscle growth, whey may be the premium choice; whey is the only protein source containing more leucine per gram than egg white protein. As you can tell, leucine is a key player in determining the best protein source available when it comes to building muscle

    Nevertheless, egg white protein powder and whey protein powder are similar in the nutrient profile, each containing 25 grams of protein per scoop. The differences are minor; whey contains 10 extra calories per scoop, 2 extra grams of fat, and 1 extra gram of carbohydrate.

    Whether you opt for egg white protein powder or not, there’s no denying its validity. Moreover, one thing that egg white protein powder stands atop the rest in is its digestive benefits.

    While whey and casein are derived from dairy milk commonly associated with digestive problems such as indigestion, gas, bloating, and diarrhea, egg white protein solves that issue!

    If nothing else, if you continue to supplement with whey or casein protein powder, Mixing egg white protein powder with your favorite whey or casein blend can actually provide you with the perfect recipe for muscle growth.

    In summary, whatever your stance is on the debate between whey and egg white protein, id suggest not to knock it until you try it!

    Downsides of Egg White Protein Powder

    While egg white powder is undoubtedly nutritious and highly valuable when it comes to protein and amino acids because it eliminates the yolk of the egg, you’re potentially missing out on many key nutrients and antioxidants.

    For some, depending on your purpose for supplementing with egg white protein powder, this may be a disadvantage.

    In addition, while lactose intolerance is much more prevalent than that of egg-based allergies, egg allergies are still present. As such, egg white protein powder may not be the right choice for those who have allergies to egg and egg products.

    If you’re unsure whether you have an allergy, you’ll learn pretty quickly if you supplement with egg white protein powder. Common symptoms include gas, bloating, indigestion, cramps, and diarrhea.

    In short, egg white protein powder is generally safe for those who don’t have allergies; the most prevalent side effects come from those with allergies to egg and egg-based products.

    Wrapping Up

    While the benefits suggested throughout this article are undoubtedly apparent, more research needs to be done on the matter. Unfortunately, because egg white protein powder is a newer source of protein powder, it has yet to be studied sufficiently and as in-depth as its competitors like whey, casein, soy, and others.

    In addition, while its basic nutrient profile is comparatively similar to the most popular protein powders on the market, egg white powder can’t yet be conclusively stated as superior. This is because it lacks antioxidants due to eliminating the nutrient-dense egg yolk. It also lacks the benefits that both casein and whey provide.

    Nonetheless, egg white protein powder is an excellent quality protein powder and does have some research that backs its claims up. Additionally, egg white protein powder provides a top-notch alternative option for supplementation for those with lactose intolerances or dairy allergies.

    To conclude, if you are going to opt for egg white protein powder as your primary source of protein supplement, don’t mistake using it as a replacement for the whole egg. Simply take the benefits for what they are, and continue to consume a well-rounded, whole-foods-based diet rich in all macro and micronutrients.

    Now all that’s left to do is an experiment and try it for yourself! Who knows, maybe egg white protein powder will become your new favorite choice of protein supplements!

    About The Author

    Michael Collins

    Michael Collins

    Michael is a gym enthusiast with experience that spans more than 20 years. He started his exhilarating journey of keeping fit in his late teens, and over the years, he has immensely grown to become a resourceful gem in matters of fitness.

    He has been writing for many years, focusing on answering all the questions you may have on nutrition, muscle building and fitness. Keeping fit and staying healthy is his main passion, and this is evidenced in the articles he writes in a simple and understandable language out of intensive reading and real-life experiences.